Independent Culture

Art for the 'Enlightened' collector

Art with meaning   -   Art with purpose


Will your art collection change the world?

Before we venture into the subject of art changing the world, it may worth while looking at people's perception of art.  This varies, of course; perhaps no subject is so misunderstood as art, as Alain de Botton suggests in a short video commentary on this subject: What Is Art For?

We examine the five points listed in 'School of Life' video, and explore some of the scientific findings regarding art and mind, in an accompanying piece: Art Awakening.  There are a number of other video commentaries listed on that page, all of which provide a compelling case for  re-examining the role of art (and artists) in society. 

Here we outline five points of our own - ways in which art shapes the world: 

  1. Through our fundraising efforts - proceeds of sales benefit existing charitable organizations. Some of these projects are listed in "How are 'we changing the world' with art?" (below).

  2. Art has traditionally drawn attention to issues in the world that require greater attention. This was the idea behind our many Eyes Of Society projects, including the Social Commentary Award, sponsored by Independent Culture & New Regionalism Project, at the Toronto Outdoor Art Fair.

  3. Art is an important aspect of democracy; artists are the embodiment of Free-expression. Under authoritarian regimes, of course, artists are not free to say whatever they want. Art must reflect the officially sanction view on everything; hence, the importance of independent culture. In a free society, artists supported by the people express a wealth of different views, ideas and opinions.

  4. Art has a direct effect on the way we think; this is on a subliminal level, of course, and is generally not understood (or taken very seriously); different kinds of art not only influence the way we see the world, but also encourage different ways of interpreting information, depending on which hemisphere of the brain is engaged. Art is not simply a  function of the right brain. . .

  5. The fundamental role of art, we believe, is to maintain (perhaps even restore) the delicate  balanced of the two hemispheres of the brain. This theme has been central to this project, from the start. To begin exploring this idea, however, we invite you to see a short essay on this subject: Eyes Wide Open - Eyes Wide Shut > > >
     

How are we 'changing the world' with art?

On the most basic level, since 2015 the artists we work with have been involved with fundraiser events. The first being an exhibition of bird art - 'For The Birds' - at the Point Pelee Visitors Centre. The artists received 50% of the proceeds of sales over the course of the summer; The Friends of Point Pelee and Pelee Island Bird Observatory shared the balance.

There is nothing particularly new here, although the model we have been developing makes a specific point of supporting artists (our culture that is) in a meaningful way, when their art is used to raise funds from some other 'worthy cause.' Funds raised will be put to work, changing the world in a tangible way, by organizations such those listed about. 

 

The artists we work with all have causes they support and endorse; this 'engagement' with the larger world is an important aspect (if not defining characteristic  of Region art - Regional artists are not of the 'Art for art's sake's school.  Independent Culture, as an umbrella for the many projects our Regional artist colleagues are involved with, supports and endorses the global Public Banking movement and the promotion of Steady State Economics.

How art changes the world - changing minds

Returning to our opening supposition – that art can change the world because art changes the way we see and the way we think – we return to our exploration of the Invisible Environment.

What is Art For?

Five points

Art critic Robert Hughes called McLuhan the last thinker to believe that artists could, in fact, change the world. In the postmodern 'environment', the rationale goes, the illusion is so complete that virtually no one can see past 'the veil that has been pulled over [our] eyes'.*

 

Theodor Adorno calls postmodern culture a 'totality', for this same reason. McLuhan refers to 'the human environment' (the culture of our day) as a 'teaching machine'; alluding, perhaps, to

Art Awakening

 

 

How are we 'changing the world' with art?

On the most basic level, since 2015 the artists we work with have been involved with fundraiser events. The first being an exhibition of bird art - 'For The Birds' - at the Point Pelee Visitors Centre. The artists recieved 50% of the proceeds of sales over the course of the summer; The Friends of Point Pelee and Pelee Island Bird Observatory shared the balance.

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